We're changing the hours permanently from 5PM PST - 7PM PST in hopes we can get Akeian and Keenan to join our team on a more permanent basis.

ATLANTIS FROM THE LIPS OF PLATO

LOST, FOUND THEN LOST AGAIN

THIS IS ONE AMAZING CITY

DOT.CONNECTOR.PODCAST.by.BMC.
Atlantis is a timeless hunt. It’s treasures in the rough. It offers a lure that attracts even the most stubborn of man. In this story we’re going to tag along with one stubborn man by the name of Plato. Yes, I’m sure you’ve heard nothihgn but good things but in reality he’s a prick. He’s always been a prick and he’ll always been a g

The Atlantis Dialog: Plato’s Original Story of the Lost City and Continent
Atlantis was first presented by the Greek logician Plato in two “exchanges” he wrote in the fourth century B.C. His story of an incredible domain that sank underneath the waves — a story that Plato never at any point got done — has started millennia of discussion about whether Atlantis truly existed. Yet, did Plato mean his story as history, or similarly as a story to assist with outlining his way of thinking?

Atlantis, a likely mythical island nation mentioned in Plato’s dialogues “Timaeus” and “Critias,” has been an object of fascination among western philosophers and historians for nearly 2,400 years. Plato (c.424–328 B.C.) describes it as a powerful and advanced kingdom that sank, in a night and a day, into the ocean around 9,600 B.C. The ancient Greeks were divided as to whether Plato’s story was to be taken as history or mere metaphor. Since the 19th century there has been renewed interest in linking Plato’s Atlantis to historical locations, most commonly the Greek island of Santorini, which was destroyed by a volcanic eruption around 1,600 B.C.

Plato and His Lost City of Atlantis

Plato’s Atlantis
Plato (through the character Critias in his dialogues) describes Atlantis as an island larger than Libya and Asia Minor put together, located in the Atlantic just beyond the Pillars of Hercules—generally assumed to mean the Strait of Gibraltar. Its culture was advanced and it had a constitution suspiciously similar to the one outlined in Plato’s “Republic.” It was protected by the god Poseidon, who made his son Atlas king and namesake of the island and the ocean that surrounded it. As the Atlanteans grew powerful, their ethics declined. Their armies eventually conquered Africa as far as Egypt and Europe as far as Tyrrhenia (Etruscan Italy) before being driven back by an Athenian-led alliance. Later, by way of divine punishment, the island was beset by earthquakes and floods, and sank into a muddy sea.

The Atlantis Dialogue: Plato’s Original Story of the Lost City and Continent
Atlantis was first introduced by the Greek philosopher Plato in two “dialogues” he wrote in the fourth century B.C. His tale of a great empire that sank beneath the waves — a tale that Plato never even finished — has sparked thousands of years of debate over whether Atlantis really existed. But did Plato mean his tale as history, or just as a parable to help illustrate his philosophy?

Did you know? In 1679 the Swedish scientist Olaus Rudbeck published “Atland,” a four-volume work in which he attempted to prove that Sweden was the original site of Atlantis and that all human languages were descended from Swedish. Though considered authoritative in his homeland, few outside of Sweden found Rudbeck arguments convincing.

Plato’s Critias says he heard the story of Atlantis from his grandfather, who had heard it from the Athenian statesman Solon (300 years before Plato’s time), who had learned it from an Egyptian priest, who said it had happened 9,000 years before that. Whether or not Plato believed his own story, his intent in telling it seems to have been to boost his ideas of an ideal society, using stories of ancient victory and calamity to call to mind more recent events such as the Trojan War or Athens’ disastrous invasion of Sicily in 413 B.C. The historicity of Plato’s tale was controversial in ancient times—his follower Crantor is said to have believed it, while Strabo (writing a few centuries later) records Aristotle’s joke about Plato’s ability to conjure nations out of thin air and then destroy them.

Atlantis Reemerges
In the first centuries of the Christian era, Aristotle was taken at his word and Atlantis was little discussed. In 1627, the English philosopher and scientist Francis Bacon published a utopian novel titled “The New Atlantis,” depicting, like Plato before him, a politically and scientifically advanced society on a previously unknown oceanic island. In 1882, former U.S. Congressman Ignatius L. Donnelly published “Atlantis: The Antediluvian World,” which touched off a frenzy of works attempting to locate and learn from a historical Atlantis. Donnelly hypothesized an advanced civilization whose immigrants had populated much of ancient Europe, Africa and the Americas, and whose heroes had inspired Greek, Hindu and Scandinavian mythology. Donnelley’s theories were popularized and elaborated by turn-of-the-20th-century theosophists and are often incorporated into contemporary New Age beliefs.

From time to time, archaeologists and historians locate evidence—a swampy, prehistoric city in coastal Spain; a suspicious undersea rock formation in the Bahamas—that might be a source of the Atlantis story. Of these, the site with the widest acceptance is the Greek island of Santorini (ancient Thera), a half-submerged caldera created by the massive second-millennium-B.C. volcanic eruption whose tsunami may have hastened the collapse of the Minoan civilization on Crete.

What Did Plato Say About Atlantis?
Written by Everet Dee in History
Atlantis, the ancient lost civilization has inspired the imaginations of people for thousands of years, and was originally described by the Greek philosopher Plato. In this article we are going to answer the question: What did Plato say about Atlantis?

Atlantis was mythical ancient civilization that was written about by Plato in 360 BC. It was highly technologically advanced, and waged an unsuccessful war with Athens. The civilization came to an abrupt end after internal fighting and a series of cataclysmic natural events around 9600 B.C.

Plato described Atlantis in 363 B.C.
Atlantis was Written About by Plato the Greek Philosopher
Considered the greatest philosopher of all time, Plato said that Atlantis existed about 9000 years before his time, and that knowledge of the lost civilization had been passed down the generations. His writings are recognized as the only written records of its existence.

Timaeus and Critias
Plato described Atlantis in two Socratic dialogues called Timaeus and Critias, both written in 363 B.C. Besides describing Atlantis, these two books are cornerstones of western esoteric tradition, having deeply influenced Gnosticism, Hermeticism, and the Kabbalah.

The two books are a speech written to be told at the festival of Panathenaea, which honored the Goddess Athena. The dialogues describe a meeting to discuss the concept of the ideal state. At the request of Socrates, Timaeus of Locri, Hermocrates of Syracuse, and Critias of Athens met with him to share what they knew of how the ancient Athenians conducted their city state. Through this meeting, Plato describes the lost civilization.

Plato and Aristotle discussing philosophy.
How Plato Learned of Atlantis
Plato received the knowledge of Atlantis from an oral tradition that came from ancient Egyptian priests, who relayed the information to a Greek legislator named Solon, who lived 300 years before Plato. Solon (638-558 BC) visited Egypt where he met the priests of the goddess Neith, who passed on the knowledge of the lost civilization.

In Plato’s books, Critias describes how his great-grandfather had met Solon. Solon was one of the seven sages, a group of legendary philosophers. While studying with the priests of the goddess Neith in Egypt, Solon learned that an advanced civilization named Atlantis had existed earlier in history, and had been destroyed. One of the Egyptian priest described it to him:

“There have been, and there will be again, many destructions of mankind arising out of many causes; the greatest have been brought about by fire and water.” The priest adds, “You remember a single deluge only, but there were many previous ones” (Timaeus 22c, 23b).

Atlantis As Described by Plato
According to the description passed from Critias’ grandfather, who received it from Solon, who learned about Atlantis in Egypt, Atlantis was a powerful city state that had existed on an island in the Atlantic Ocean. It was an imperialistic empire, which ruled over other islands, as well as part of Africa and Europe.

The civilization consisted of a series of islands of concentric circles. Plato described Atlantis as possessing 10,000 chariots, advanced technologies, a series of complex canals, and a vast number of bull and elephants. The soil was rich, and abundant agriculture was produced in the plains area of the island, which made use of sophisticated irrigation systems. In the centre of the island where public baths, including fountains with hot and cold water, and recreation areas, as well as a government and military.

According to Plato, the Atlanteans mined white, black, and red stones for use in their construction. The circles of land had outer walls covered in brass, and the inner walls were orichalch. In the central island was a sanctuary dedicated to Poseidon and Cleito, which was surrounded by gold walls. This was where the first ten princes of Atlantis were born, and their descendants would bring them offerings.

Throughout Plato’s two books are references to higher beings, or gods. Plato describes the inhabitants of Atlantis as being half human and half god, and of great wisdom and spiritual enlightenment, as well as possessing advanced technology.

Atlantis and Athens
Contrary to ideas about Atlantis that came later than Plato, he describes it not as a peaceful utopia, but rather as an empire with an army, who was enemies with Athens, his home city state. According to Plato’s writings, Atlantis tried to use its military to dominate the ancient Greek world, but was stopped by Athens in a military conflict. When Atlantis waged an unprovoked war on parts of Asia and Europe not yet under their control, Athens, despite being a much smaller city state, triumphantly defeated Atlantis’s attempt at conquering them.

Origins of Atlantis
According to Plato, in the beginning of the world the gods divided earth amongst themselves. Each god had their own allotment and established temples, a priestcraft, and a system of sacrifice. Poseidon was given the sea and the island continent of Atlantis. On the island was a mountain where three humans lived, a man named Evenor, along with his wife Leucipe, and their daughter Cleito. The daughter was very beautiful and when her parents died she was wooed by Poseidon. Together they had five pairs of twin sons. Poseidon established them as the rulers of the continent, with Atlas, the eldest, being the overlord of the others. The part the islands closer to the Pillars of Hercules, were given to Atlas’s twin Gaedeirus. Poseidon named the continent Atlantis, and the surrounding ocean the Atlantic. He made the continent a series of perfect concentric circles of land and water. Two zones of land and three of water surrounded the central island, which was irrigated by two springs of water, one warm and one cold.

The descendants of Atlas continued to rule Atlantis, and it became a utopian-like country. There were abundant natural resources, including precious metals and domesticated animals. The island had a plains area which was used for agriculture, which was watered by their sophisticated irrigation system. They constructed palaces and temples, as well as bridges and canals from the outer sea zones to the central island where the palaces were. The most magnificent of the palaces in the central island was the temple of Poseidon.

Who Was Plato?
Plato was a citizen of Athens, who live from 428-438 B.C. His work is of unparalleled influence, and dealt with ethics, physics, including such topics as justice, beauty, and equality, He was a student of Socrates, the teacher of Aristotle, and founded the Academy, the first institution of higher learning in the Western world.

The Pillars Of Hercules in Antigua
Where Was Atlantis Located According to Plato?
Plato’s books are not clear on the location of Atlantis, though there are many theories. Studies have shown that the bottom of parts of the Atlantic Ocean show evidence of once being above water. Some believe that the island Santorini, which was destroyed by a volcano in 1600 B.C, was Atlantis. Plato’s writings do include some clues to the location however:

“situated in front of the straits which are by you called the Pillars of Heracles [the Straits of Gibraltar]. The island was larger than Libya* and Asia put together, and was the way to other islands, and from these you might pass to the whole of the opposite continent which surrounded the true ocean” (Timaeus 25e).

The Pillars of Hercules are Located between Europe and Morocco and are pieces of land called promontories, which are pieces of land that jut out from the side of the coast. According to Greek mythology they were placed there by Hercules. This has been interpreted by many to suggest that Atlantis was located near that part of the world.

The Fall of Atlantis
According to Plato, Atlantis reach its demise around 9600 B.C. The nation destroyed itself as a result of the irreverent use of dangerous supernatural powers. Shortly after its failed attempt at conquering Athens, a series of earthquakes sunk Atlantis into the ocean, completing wiping it off the face of the earth.

“in a single day and night … disappeared into the depths of the sea.” – Plato

The cataclysm was created by the gods In response to the Atlanteans growing materialism and lack of reverence, and in a single cataclysmic night they sent fire and earthquakes that made Atlantis sink into the ocean, completely destroying the civilization.

“After having undergone the very extremity of danger, she defeated and triumphed over the invaders, and preserved from slavery those who were not yet subjugated, and generously liberated all the rest of us who dwell within the Pillars. But afterward there occurred violent earthquakes and floods, and in a single day and night of misfortune all your warlike men in a body sank into the earth, and the island of Atlantis in like manner disappeared in the depths of the sea. For which reason the sea in those parts is impassable and impenetrable, because there is a shoal of mud in the way, and this was caused by the subsidence of the island” (Timaeus 25c-d)

Atlantis as an Allegory
Interpretations of Plato’s writing on Atlantis are split, with some taking it to be a literal description of a real place, while the majority see his writing as being a fictional story in which Plato intended to make a philosophical statement. When viewed as a legend or myth, a meaning can be found in the story of Atlantis. it represents a failed utopia which teaches us a lesson about how to properly conduct a state. It is the story of highly ethical and spiritually enlightened people who lost their way by becoming greedy, corrupt and gluttonous. Their ways lead them to their demise, as they stop living in harmony, and their civilization is destroyed by earthquakes that sink them into the ocean.

Other interpretations point out its commentary on wealth vs modesty, and maritime vs agrarian societies, as it describes the smaller but ethical state triumphing over the larger corrupt aggressor.

Ongoing Interest in Plato’s Descriptions of Atlantis
While Plato’s descriptions of Atlantis are often considered the only legitimate source of academic writings on Atlantis, interest in the subject matter has continued to present time.

The Renaissance Writers
Atlantis was a popular theme amongst Renaissance writers, with Thomas More penning Utopia, which is actually where the word utopia comes from. Francis Bacon wrote New Atlantis, published in 1626, in which he describes a vision for a future humanity based on “generosity and enlightenment, dignity and splendour, piety and public spirit”.

Ignatius Donnelly
Donnelly was a congressmen and amateur researcher in the 1800s, who believed Atlantis had really existed. He wrote about and popularized the idea that it was a real place. It writing is an impressive compilation of everything that was known about Atlantis.

The Theosophists
Writing in the late 1800s, H.P. Blavatsky described a very different Atlantis than the one Plato wrote about, in her books Isis Unveiled and The Secret Doctrine. She describes Atlantis as being significantly older than Plato, coming to an end 850 000 years ago.

Edgar Cayce
According to the psychic readings of Cayce, which were conducted in the early 1900’s and later were turned into books which sold over a million copies, Atlantis was destroyed in a series of three cataclysms, in 58000, 20000, and 10000 B.C.

Atlantis Found
Over the years there have been many claims that Atlantis has been found. Perhaps most popularly known is the claimed discovery off the coast of Spain. Other researchers dispute this claim, as well as all other claims, in part pointing to the fact that the Mediterranean ocean is full of the ruins of previous other civilizations.

Searches for Atlantis continue to this day. In recent years a company called Merlin Borrows has been looking off the coast of Spain, referencing historical records and combining with satellite data. Focusing on a region of Spain just inland of the coast called Doñana National Park, they discovered large circles that they believe could be the base of Atlantean temples. They also claim to have found evidence of cataclysmic events that could be related to the end of Atlantis.

In 2009 and 2010 an American team continued the search just north of the city of Cadiz, in Spain. Using deep-ground radar, and digital mapping, they surveyed a marshland region of Spain called Dona Ana park.

The Atlantis Dialog: Plato’s Original Story of the Lost City and Continent
Atlantis was first introduced by the Greek philosopher Plato in two “trades” he wrote in the fourth century B.C. His account of an extraordinary space that sank under the waves — a story that Plato never anytime finished — has begun centuries of conversation about whether Atlantis genuinely existed. However, did Plato mean his story as history, or likewise as a story to help with framing his perspective?

Atlantis, a probable legendary island country referenced in Plato’s exchanges “Timaeus” and “Critias,” has been an object of interest among western scholars and history specialists for almost 2,400 years. Plato (c.424-328 B.C.) portrays it as a strong and high level realm that sank, in an evening and a day, into the sea around 9,600 B.C. The antiquated Greeks were isolated with respect to whether Plato’s story was to be taken as history or simple similitude. Since the nineteenth hundred years there has been recharged interest in connecting Plato’s Atlantis to verifiable areas, most ordinarily the Greek island of Santorini, which was obliterated by a volcanic emission around 1,600 B.C.

Plato’s Atlantis
Plato (through the person Critias in his discoursed) depicts Atlantis as an island bigger than Libya and Asia Minor set up, situated in the Atlantic just past the Pillars of Hercules — by and large accepted to mean the Strait of Gibraltar. Its way of life was progressed and it had a constitution dubiously like the one framed in Plato’s “Republic.” It was safeguarded by the god Poseidon, who made his child Atlas ruler and namesake of the island and the sea that encompassed it. As the Atlanteans developed strong, their morals declined. Their militaries in the end vanquished Africa to the extent that Egypt and Europe to the extent that Tyrrhenia (Etruscan Italy) prior to being driven back by an Athenian-drove partnership. Afterward, via divine discipline, the island was plagued by quakes and floods, and sank into a sloppy ocean.

The Atlantis Dialog: Plato’s Original Story of the Lost City and Continent
Atlantis was first presented by the Greek logician Plato in two “exchanges” he wrote in the fourth century B.C. His story of an incredible domain that sank underneath the waves — a story that Plato never at any point got done — has ignited millennia of discussion about whether Atlantis truly existed. Be that as it may, did Plato mean his story as history, or similarly as an illustration to assist with delineating his way of thinking?

Did you be aware? In 1679 the Swedish researcher Olaus Rudbeck distributed “Atland,” a four-volume work in which he endeavored to demonstrate that Sweden was the first site of Atlantis and that all human dialects were dropped from Swedish. However viewed as legitimate in his country, barely any beyond Sweden found Rudbeck’s contentions persuading.

Plato’s Critias says he heard the tale of Atlantis from his granddad, who had heard it from the Athenian legislator Solon (300 years before Plato’s time), who had gained it from an Egyptian cleric, who said it had happened 9,000 years before that. Whether Plato accepted his own story, his expectation in telling it appears to have been to help his thoughts of an optimal society, utilizing accounts of old triumph and disaster to bring to mind later occasions, for example, the Trojan War or Athens’ grievous attack of Sicily in 413 B.C. The trustworthiness of Plato’s story was disputable in old times — his devotee Crantor is said to have trusted it, while Strabo (composing years and years after the fact) records Aristotle’s kid about Plato’s capacity to summon countries out of nowhere and afterward obliterate them.

Atlantis Reemerges
In the main hundreds of years of the Christian period, Aristotle was trusted and Atlantis was little talked about. In 1627, the English thinker and researcher Francis Bacon distributed an idealistic novel named “The New Atlantis,” portraying, similar to Plato before him, a strategically and deductively progressed society on a formerly obscure maritime island. In 1882, previous U.S. Senator Ignatius L. Donnelly distributed “Atlantis: The Antediluvian World,” which ignited a craze of works endeavoring to find and gain from a verifiable Atlantis. Donnelly speculated a high level development whose migrants had populated a lot of old Europe, Africa and the Americas, and whose legends had enlivened Greek, Hindu and Scandinavian folklore. Donnelley’s speculations were advocated and explained by turn-of-the-twentieth century theosophists and are frequently integrated into contemporary New Age convictions.

Every once in a while, archeologists and history specialists find proof — a marshy, ancient city in waterfront Spain; a dubious undersea stone development in the Bahamas — that may be a wellspring of the Atlantis story. Of these, the site with the greatest acknowledgment is the Greek island of Santorini (old Thera), a half-lowered caldera made by the monstrous second-thousand years B.C. volcanic ejection whose wave might have hurried the breakdown of the Minoan human advancement on Crete.

What Did Plato Say About Atlantis?
Composed by Everet Dee in History
Atlantis, the antiquated lost human advancement has motivated the minds of individuals for millennia, and was initially depicted by the Greek logician Plato. In this article we will respond to the inquiry: What did Plato say regarding Atlantis?

Atlantis was legendary antiquated civilization that was expounded on by Plato in 360 BC. It was profoundly mechanically progressed, and pursued a fruitless conflict with Athens. The development reached a sudden conclusion after inner battling and a progression of disastrous regular occasions around 9600 B.C.

Plato portrayed Atlantis in 363 B.C.
Atlantis was Written About by Plato the Greek Philosopher
Considered the best thinker ever, Plato said that Atlantis existed around 9000 years before his time, and that information on the lost progress had been passed down the ages. His compositions are perceived as the main set up accounts of its presence.

Timaeus and Critias
Plato depicted Atlantis in two Socratic exchanges called Timaeus and Critias, both written in 363 B.C. Other than depicting Atlantis, these two books are foundations of western recondite custom, having profoundly impacted Gnosticism, Hermeticism, and the Kabbalah.

The two books are a discourse written to be told at the celebration of Panathenaea, which regarded the Goddess Athena. The discoursed portray a gathering to examine the idea of the best state. In line with Socrates, Timaeus of Locri, Hermocrates of Syracuse, and Critias of Athens met with him to share what they was aware of how the antiquated Athenians led their city state. Through this gathering, Plato depicts the lost progress.

Plato and Aristotle talking about way of thinking.
How Plato Learned of Atlantis
Plato got the information on Atlantis from an oral custom that came from old Egyptian clerics, who handed-off the data to a Greek lawmaker named Solon, who lived 300 years before Plato. Solon (638-558 BC) visited Egypt where he met the ministers of the goddess Neith, who passed on the information on the lost development.

In Plato’s books, Critias portrays how his extraordinary granddad had met Solon. Solon was one of the seven sages, a gathering of unbelievable savants. While considering with the clerics of the goddess Neith in Egypt, Solon discovered that a high level development named Atlantis had existed before ever, and had been obliterated. One of the Egyptian minister depicted it to him:

“There have been, and there will be in the future, numerous obliterations of humanity emerging out of many causes; the best have been achieved by fire and water.” The minister adds, “You recall a solitary downpour just, however there were numerous past ones” (Timaeus 22c, 23b).

Atlantis As Described by Plato
As per the depiction passed from Critias’ granddad, who got it from Solon, who found out about Atlantis in Egypt, Atlantis was a strong city express that had existed on an island in the Atlantic Ocean. It was an imperialistic domain, which controlled over different islands, as well as a feature of Africa and Europe.

The human progress comprised of a progression of islands of concentric circles. Plato depicted Atlantis as having 10,000 chariots, trend setting innovations, a progression of mind boggling trenches, and countless bull and elephants. The dirt was rich, and bountiful agribusiness was delivered in the fields region of the island, which utilized modern water system frameworks. In the focal point of the island where public showers, incorporating wellsprings with hot and cold water, and entertainment regions, as well as an administration and military.

As per Plato, the Atlanteans mined white, dark, and red stones for use in their development. The circles of land took care of external dividers in metal, and the internal dividers were orichalch. In the focal island was a safe-haven devoted to Poseidon and Cleito, which was encircled by gold dividers. This was where the initial ten rulers of Atlantis were conceived, and their relatives would bring them contributions.

All through Plato’s two books are references to higher creatures, or divine beings. Plato portrays the occupants of Atlantis as being half human and half god, and of incredible insight and profound edification, as well as having trend setting innovation.

Atlantis and Athens
As opposed to thoughts regarding Atlantis that came later than Plato, he portrays it not as a tranquil perfect world, yet rather as a realm with a military, who was foes with Athens, his home city state. As per Plato’s works, Atlantis attempted to utilize its military to overwhelm the old Greek world, yet was come by Athens in a tactical clash. At the point when Atlantis pursued an unwarranted conflict on pieces of Asia and Europe not yet under their influence, Athens, in spite of being a lot more modest city state, victoriously crushed Atlantis’ effort to vanquish them.

Join this channel to get access to perks:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZNUWF4e4DyGD5rcgHe7CvA/join

Check Out Our Boogie Man Merch Center Here:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZNUWF4e4DyGD5rcgHe7CvA/store

#skydomeatlantis #fakestars #fakestar #hologram #holocloaking

This amazing video is proudly presented by our sponsor || SIZZLE CITY || Strings of Bling and Other Shiny Things || Call or Click Today || www.SizzleCity.com || 626.274.6028 || Hot Products / Sizzling Prices ||
************************************************************Join us on the website: 
www.4TheWoke.com

The Blog:
https://www.4thewoke.com/blog/. 

Podcast Library:
https://www.4thewoke.com/podcast-library/ 

************************************************************CONNECT WITH US
************************************************************Boogie Merch:
Main URL: https://SkyWoker.com
Alt URL: https://tinyurl.com/n6yrnkre

Our Website: 
URL: https://4thewoke.com/

Email:
NOTE: Please don't send emails any larger than 20mg, that rule applies to ANY and ALL emails. 
BoogieMan@4TheWoke.com
BoogieBexx@4TheWoke.com

Book us for an interview:
ytech.satellite2550@gmail.com

Donate: (CA$H APP)
Name: $BOOGIEMANCHANNEL

Donate: (PayPal)
URL: https://tinyurl.com/4krpaet6

Donate: (Zelle)
Registered Phone Number: 6262746028

Twitter: 
@MyBoogieWoogie1
https://tinyurl.com/u9szm9kc

Facebook:
Page Name: Boogie Man Channel
URL: https://tinyurl.com/yttcm9p6

Instagram:
Account Name: BoogieManChannel
URL: https://tinyurl.com/9d6yex3z

Join Us on Reddit: (I HATE REDDIT)
Username: BoogieManChannel
URL: https://tinyurl.com/2x69k89m

Pinterest:
NOTE: We love love love Pinterest
URL: https://tinyurl.com/48z9nvpx

Amazon Music: Podcasts
URL: https://tinyurl.com/3a5u4yck

Spotify
URL: https://tinyurl.com/f22w49w

Anchor FM
URL: https://tinyurl.com/pcujwftu

Google Podcasts
https://tinyurl.com/4tjhchta

Spotify  Podcasts
https://tinyurl.com/2749uw8v

CastBox
https://tinyurl.com/3rr54en7

Radio Public
https://tinyurl.com/mvxt2kyz

Stitcher
https://tinyurl.com/49ma8y4h

Bitchute - This One Sucks
NOTE: This is the worst website ever. 
URL: https://bitchute.com/boogiemanchannel 

Our New BIGO Live "Behind the Scenes" Channel - Go Live Behind the Camera with Us
https://www.bigo.tv/en/BoogieManChannel

This is my Official BIGO LIVE App Download Link: 
http://bigolive.onelink.me/sG8X?pid=region_kol&c=US_boogiemancanal&is_retargeting=true 
NOTE: Please use this link to download Bigo Live from the app store as I get a few bucks from your
download and it saves me from asking you for donations - I'm well taken care of now from the owners 
of the app. 

Our New Podcast Blog
https://Dot-Connector-Podcast.com

Rumble: 
https://Rumble.com/BoogieManChannel

************************************************************

Please be good to one another and of course always be good to yourself.

Please use this opportunity to prepare for the worst and of course always hope for the best.

Always live everyday like there is no tomorrow, because tomorrow is promised to no man or woman.